Psst! Cool Stuff: 7 African Songs To Listen To

Morola

In this edition of Cool stuff, we’re bringing you jams with a bit of zest from regions across Africa. These jams pack a rhythm and a seamless blend of dance, rap, and more with a large emphasis on delivery. These artists have displayed a generous amount of floss making sure to catch and hold your attention.

Ronehi & SGaWD – Telfar  (NG)

Bright and Bouncy Telfar is the perfect song for an upbeat day in the sun as SGaWD confidently delivers bars on this soft Alté hiphop fusion track. SGaWD a.k.a The “Popshit” crooner is currently one of the women at the forefront of the hip hop scene/rap game in Nigeria and in an industry where people, especially women are shrinking themselves, SGaWD doesn’t mince any words. She says what she wants to say audaciously with bright, unusual and alluring visuals to emphasise this. On this jam, she partners with the talented producer Ronehi, to create an electric jam that makes you feel sultry— another confirmation that SGaWD is exactly who she thinks she is.

Kamo Mphela   – Nkulukulu (SA)

Singer, dancer and choreographer a.k.a “Queen of Amapiano”, Kamo Mphela has established herself as a force to be reckoned with in the South African and global Amapiano scene and Nkulukulu, is no exception. Starting off as a prayer and transitioning to what seems like the preparation for battle, the visuals tell a compelling story. Coupled with her vocal dexterity, the drums and shakers on the beat make you bop your head and tap your feet. If you need ginger to finish a task or prepare for a presentation Nkulukulu is the track for you! A sizzling blend of singing and spot-on dance moves will kickstart your day,

Zamir – Ordre du jour (NG)

Zamir, a member of the LOS music group has been navigating a unique and experimental range of hip hop featuring trap sounds blind to induce some aggressive head bopping. His delivery is spot on complimented by his commanding tone and persona and on this track, he secures his grip on experimental hip hop sending you to another dimension with bars delivered in English, French, and Yoruba. The inspiration for this one feels otherworldly in ways that cannot be described so I certainly hope you check this one out for yourself.

Oumou Sangare – Mogoya (ML)

the Songbird of Wassoulou, Oumou Sangare sang her heart out in this uplifting track where she sings passionately about the fickle nature of humans and how trying to satisfy people will usually never end well. With this track, Oumou successfully sets herself apart within a genre and establishes a signature sound.

Kawabanga – Akatafoc ft O’Kenneth, Reggie & Jay Bahd (GH)

An electric rendition of Drill from Ghana, this track features a heavy influence by pop smoke’s sound which was reimagined and restructured into something truly African and bound to get the speakers thumping. No doubt this song is bound to get a party moving and keep ringing in your head for days after; Listening to this song is always an experience. Kawabanga is the banger you need to keep your party banging!

Omah Lay  – I’m a mess (NG)

If you’re someone that has experienced significant doses of melancholy and sadness the replay value of this track is limitless for you. Omah Lay once again makes his mark on the industry, doing his own thing by singing about the things tearing him apart and structuring his pain in ways that don’t feel too heavy for the listener to carry. On this track, he speaks candidly about the things he struggles with. The level of vulnerability and openness largely complimented by the catchy beat it flows through makes the song more relatable and replay worthy.

9umba,Toss & Mdoovar – Umlando ft Sino Msolo, Lady Du, Young stunna, Sir Trill & Slade (SA)

Did you know that the Umlando dance step was coined from a song? The South African production and vocalist trio released an electric tune that sparked a viral dance challenge and garnered over 270 million unique views on TikTok and made the song go platinum. This undeniably shifted them from underdogs to history makers.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s